Disabled

 

Despite the many health advantages of physical activity, many Disabled individuals  still do not get enough exercise. This may be due to barriers that prevent them from participating in physical activities.

To encourage people to become more physically active, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are advocating inclusive physical activity strategies that can enhance health outcomes for people living with disabilities and their families.

Upper Body Workouts

Upper body workouts can improve your posture and independence when sitting in a wheelchair. They also increase stamina by strengthening muscles in the shoulder, arms, chest, and back.

Strengthening the muscles in your upper body not only makes daily tasks easier, but it may also lower your risk for chronic illnesses and injuries like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Exercises for the upper body can be done from a seated position using resistance bands, free weights or your own bodyweight. While you are free to make these exercises as strenuous as desired, it is essential that you avoid overexertion or injury.

Building upper body strength is best achieved through exercises that incorporate weights and resistance. Examples of such exercises include shoulder presses, bicep curls, and tricep extensions. Begin with lighter weights and resistance before gradually progressing to heavier amounts with increased difficulty.

Lower Body Workouts

Exercise the lower body is especially beneficial for wheelchair users as prolonged sitting in a chair can lead to weight gain, weak muscles and stiff joints.

Thankfully, there are plenty of exercises you can do while sitting in a chair or wheelchair. Many involve isometric exercises for added challenge.

Isometrics are muscle contractions held and used as resistance to build strength and endurance. They may also be beneficial in combatting conditions like cerebral palsy, stroke, obesity, arthritis, fibromyalgia and injuries.

Exercises can be done in a wheelchair, bed or any other safe and comfortable place. Plus, if you fall or require assistance, having someone by your side can make the experience much smoother.

Core Workouts

A strong core can assist you with everyday activities like getting up from your chair or climbing stairs. It also helps prevent falls and promotes good posture.

For wheelchair users, seated crunches are an ideal exercise that strengthens abdominal muscles while keeping your back straight and supporting the spine. Start on hands and knees, tightening abdominal muscles; then lower yourself onto forearms with shoulders directly over elbows and feet in the air behind you.

Another excellent cardiovascular workout option for people with disability services melbourne is an arm bike machine, which works the arms, back and shoulder muscles. This time-saving alternative to running or other longer distances provides beneficial exercise without risking injuries.

Leg Workouts

Leg workouts are an excellent way to build strength in your legs, maintain mobility and increase flexibility. These exercises are especially beneficial for individuals living with paraplegia.

Sitting in a wheelchair can cause muscles to lose strength and mass. Therefore, it is essential for wheelchair users to maintain their muscle mass as well as develop leg strength.

If you have access to a gym, try sitting on an elliptical exercise machine. This machine will stimulate your spinal cord and improve circulation.

Chair leg extensions are an easy isometric exercise that can be done from home. Simply place one foot inside the loop of a leg lifter and gradually pull until mild resistance is felt.

Knee lifts are an effective exercise to build leg strength. Sitting down, alternately lift your knees as if you were marching. This will help build the movement patterns necessary for regaining walking function.

 

Despite the many health advantages of physical activity, many individuals with disabilities still do not get enough exercise. This may be due to barriers that prevent them from participating in physical activities.

To encourage people to become more physically active, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are advocating inclusive physical activity strategies that can enhance health outcomes for people living with disabilities and their families.

Upper Body Workouts

Upper body workouts can improve your posture and independence when sitting in a wheelchair. They also increase stamina by strengthening muscles in the shoulder, arms, chest, and back.

Strengthening the muscles in your upper body not only makes daily tasks easier, but it may also lower your risk for chronic illnesses and injuries like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Exercises for the upper body can be done from a seated position using resistance bands, free weights or your own bodyweight. While you are free to make these exercises as strenuous as desired, it is essential that you avoid overexertion or injury.

Building upper body strength is best achieved through exercises that incorporate weights and resistance. Examples of such exercises include shoulder presses, bicep curls, and tricep extensions. Begin with lighter weights and resistance before gradually progressing to heavier amounts with increased difficulty.

Lower Body Workouts

Exercise the lower body is especially beneficial for wheelchair users as prolonged sitting in a chair can lead to weight gain, weak muscles and stiff joints.

Thankfully, there are plenty of exercises you can do while sitting in a chair or wheelchair. Many involve isometric exercises for added challenge.

Isometrics are muscle contractions held and used as resistance to build strength and endurance. They may also be beneficial in combatting conditions like cerebral palsy, stroke, obesity, arthritis, fibromyalgia and injuries.

Exercises can be done in a wheelchair, bed or any other safe and comfortable place. Plus, if you fall or require assistance, having someone by your side can make the experience much smoother.

Core Workouts

A strong core can assist you with everyday activities like getting up from your chair or climbing stairs. It also helps prevent falls and promotes good posture.

For wheelchair users, seated crunches are an ideal exercise that strengthens abdominal muscles while keeping your back straight and supporting the spine. Start on hands and knees, tightening abdominal muscles; then lower yourself onto forearms with shoulders directly over elbows and feet in the air behind you.

Another excellent cardiovascular workout option for people with disabilities is an arm bike machine, which works the arms, back and shoulder muscles. This time-saving alternative to running or other longer distances provides beneficial exercise without risking injuries.

Leg Workouts

Leg workouts are an excellent way to build strength in your legs, maintain mobility and increase flexibility. These exercises are especially beneficial for individuals living with paraplegia.

Sitting in a wheelchair can cause muscles to lose strength and mass. Therefore, it is essential for wheelchair users to maintain their muscle mass as well as develop leg strength.

If you have access to a gym, try sitting on an elliptical exercise machine. This machine will stimulate your spinal cord and improve circulation.

Chair leg extensions are an easy isometric exercise that can be done from home. Simply place one foot inside the loop of a leg lifter and gradually pull until mild resistance is felt.

Knee lifts are an effective exercise to build leg strength. Sitting down, alternately lift your knees as if you were marching. This will help build the movement patterns necessary for regaining walking function.

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